‘Innocent Until Proven Guilty’? Not At Most American Universities

The term, “innocent until proven guilty,” is known in American culture as based upon a legal principle when accused of a crime. The usage of this principle, however, is becoming a scarcity in today’s culture on many American University campuses. Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) conducted a report that shows alarming statistics about the nation’s top 53 institutions of higher learning.

Excerpt:

“Students accused of serious campus offenses routinely face life-altering punishment without a meaningful opportunity to defend themselves,” Susan Kruth, lead author of the FIRE report, said in a statement. “Universities need to provide basic procedural protections that help ensure accurate outcomes, and right now they overwhelmingly do not.”

FIRE found the top universities using the U.S. News and World Report’s annual rankings, and rated the institutions based on how many of 10 “fundamental procedural safeguards” provided to students.

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Source: ‘Innocent Until Proven Guilty’? Not At Most American Universities | The Daily Wire

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