‘Ahok’ Case Highlights Indonesia’s Blasphemy Law

With the release of Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, the former governor of Jakarta, who served most of a two-year sentence for blasphemy, there is a focus on the law that brought down a popular politician best known as Ahok. Ahok is a Chinese Christian who had been found guilty of blasphemy by the North Jarkata District Court in Indonesia on May 5, 2017.

Excerpt:

Blasphemy is defined in Article 156a of Indonesia’s 1965 criminal code as “abusing or staining a religion adhered to in Indonesia” when the act is committed with “the intention to prevent a person to adhere to any religion based on belief of the almighty God,” according to Rafiqa Qurrata A’yun, a lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of Indonesia writing in Inside Indonesia.

In short, going outside the central tenets of Indonesia’s six officially recognized religions — Buddhism, Catholicism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Protestantism and Islam — can mean five years in prison. Virtually all the blasphemy cases involve Islam.

[Read More…]

Source: ‘Ahok’ Case Highlights Indonesia’s Blasphemy Law | VOA News

About The Author

No Comments on "‘Ahok’ Case Highlights Indonesia’s Blasphemy Law"

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *